Tooele Transcript Bulletin – News in Tooele, Utah

October 27, 2020
Local bareback rider has won world-wide titles three times

Farmboy Jason Olsen has been bucking horses since he was 14 

Jasen Olsen said that there’s nothing like bareback riding in the world.

Olsen, 49, lives in Tooele. He has five kids that range in ages from 10 years old to 23 years old.

Besides bareback riding, he enjoys spending time with his boys, granddaughter, and working.

Olsen was raised on a farm and rode horses to hunt, and worked with draft horses.

However, his love of bucking horses didn’t start until he was 14.

“I can ride bucking horses, of course, but I don’t ride regular horses that good actually,” Olsen laughed. “My family is always teasing me.”

Olsen said that he actually fell off of a horse with a regular saddle riding it around an arena after he won a title in California.

Growing up, Olsen competed in high school rodeos and won a state championship.

He then began competing professionally at age 18.

“I got so I loved it,” he said. “My dream has always been to ride bucking horses for a living and to be world champion. I won my first world title last year and it took me 34 years to get it.”

Olsen explained bareback riding.

“You have a handle that you hold onto and you wedge your hand in it, so it won’t come loose,” he said. “You use your feet to get a hold of the horse to get them up. Bucking horses are just like show horses. They breed them to buck and they actually like to do it. You ride for eight seconds and you’re scored from one to 25 and one to 25 for the horse. You can get up to 100 points for each side.”

At the end of the season, all of the money bareback riders win is added up and if the rider has won enough money, they are entered into the world finals.

Olsen has won three world titles beginning in 2019 and has won rodeos all across the county.

He has also competed at the Wilderness Circuit Finals and won a state championship in 1989.

“The state championship win meant a lot to me,” he said.

Olsen said that a lot of his family members are interested in riding as well.

Every night Olsen rides a stationary board for about an hour.

He also runs on a treadmill for about an hour a day.

“Throughout the day I think about riding on and off,” he said.

Olsen hurt his neck recently riding and is having trouble with his C5 cervical vertebra.

“As long as they can fix that, I plan on riding a few more years,” he said.

Riding makes Olsen feel free.

“I love that no matter what’s going on in the world or what problems you have, everything just goes away,” he said. “For about 10 seconds, everything is gone and it’s just you out there with the horse. When you get on the horse that’s jumping and bucking you off, and you’re doing your best to stay on, and the crowd is screaming, and you hit the ground, and you know you rode good and the horse bucked good, it’s just this good feeling. There’s nothing like it in the world. It’s just living free.

Olsen said that he’s thankful for the country he lives in, because he is able to ride.

“I know that right now it’s been a rough year for everyone but even though it’s rough and it seems like everyone’s at each other’s throats, I am grateful every day for this country where I live,” he said. “Where else could you do this? I think sometimes we all forget about that or at least I do, and I don’t want to forget that I love this country.”

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>