Tooele Transcript Bulletin – News in Tooele, Utah
image Audie Murphy

January 21, 2013
Week of January 21, 2013

• On Jan. 23, 1849, Elizabeth Blackwell is granted a medical degree from Geneva College in New York, becoming the first female to be officially recognized as a physician in U.S. history. In 1857, she founded the New York Infirmary for Women and Children.

 

• On Jan. 27, 1888, the National Geographic Society is founded in Washington, D.C. Readership in its magazine did not grow, however, until it discarded the format of overly technical articles and used articles of general interest accompanied by photographs. “National Geographic” quickly became known for its stunning and pioneering photography.

 

• On Jan. 25, 1905, at the Premier Mine in Pretoria, South Africa, a 3,106-carat diamond, the “Cullinan,” is discovered. Worried that the diamond might be stolen in transit from Africa to London, a phony diamond was sent as a decoy aboard a steamer ship loaded with detectives, while the real stone slowly made its way in a plain box.

 

• On Jan. 24, 1935, canned beer makes its debut when the Gottfried Krueger Brewing Company delivered 2,000 cans of beer and ale to faithful Krueger drinkers in Richmond, Va. Ninety-one percent of the drinkers approved of the canned beer, prompting Krueger to give the green light to further production

 

• On Jan. 26, 1945, the most decorated soldier of World War II, American Lt. Audie Murphy, is wounded in France. Murphy was wounded three times, fought in nine major campaigns across Europe, and was credited with killing 241 Germans. He won 37 medals and decorations.

 

• On Jan. 21, 1957, Patsy Cline, one of the most important figures in country-music history, first gains national attention with her winning appearance on “Arthur Godfrey’s Talent Scouts.” Cline wowed the studio audience with her performance of the now-classic “Walkin’ After Midnight.”

 

• On Jan. 22, 1973, the Supreme Court decriminalizes abortion by handing down its decision in the case of Roe v. Wade. For most of the country’s first 100 years, abortion was not a criminal offense, nor was it considered immoral.

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