Tooele Transcript Bulletin – News in Tooele, Utah
image Guggenheim Museum in New York

October 21, 2013
Week of October 21, 2013

• On Oct. 26, 1825, the Erie Canal opens, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean via the Hudson River. Built in only two years, 83 canal locks accommodated the 500-foot rise in elevation. The canal was 363 miles long, 40 feet wide and 4 feet deep. In nine years, tolls had paid back the cost of construction.

 

• On Oct. 25, 1861, the keel of the Union ironclad Monitor is laid at Greenpoint, N.Y. The vessel — 172 feet long and 41 feet wide — had a low profile, rising only 18 inches above the water. The ship had a draft of less than 11 feet so it could operate in the shallow harbors and rivers of the South.

 

• On Oct. 27, 1904, the New York City subway opens. The first line, operated by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT), traveled 9.1 miles through 28 stations. That evening, the subway opened to the general public, and more than 100,000 people paid a nickel each to take their first ride under Manhattan.

 

• On Oct. 24, 1945, the United Nations Charter, which was adopted and signed on June 26, takes effect and is ready to be enforced. Representatives of 50 nations attended the first conference.

 

• On Oct. 21, 1959, on New York City’s Fifth Avenue, thousands of people line up outside a bizarrely shaped white concrete building that resembled a giant upside-down cupcake. It was opening day at the new Guggenheim Museum, home to one of the world’s top collections of contemporary art.

 

• On Oct. 22, 1962, President John F. Kennedy announces that the Soviet Union has placed nuclear weapons in Cuba and that the United States will establish military blockade to prevent any other offensive weapons from entering the island nation just 90 miles from the Florida Keys.

 

• On Oct. 23, 1989, a series of explosions sparked by an ethylene gas leak at a plastics factory in Pasadena, Texas, kills 23 people. Approximately 85,000 pounds of highly flammable ethylene-isobutane gas were released into the plant. Within two minutes, the large gas cloud ignited with the power of two-and-a-half tons of dynamite.

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